Allison Davies
Allison Davies (she/her) creates online resources for parents, educators and service providers and works with schools to deliver professional development around the topics of childhood brain development and the use of music as a regulatory tool.
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Who is Allison?
Education and professional career
Allison Davies creates online resources for parents, educators and support staff and works with schools to deliver professional development around the topics of childhood brain development and the use of music as a regulatory tool. She is an independent liberatory scholar currently exploring the gatekeeping and classism of the social construct ‘musical vs non musical’.

Allison holds a Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Teaching (University of New England, 2003), a Master of Music Therapy (University of Queensland, 2005) and Neurologic Music Therapy training (Academy of Neurologic Music Therapy, 2016). A former Registered Music Therapist of 16 years, Alli left the Allied Health industry in 2021 in order to align her work more deeply with culturally responsive practices and to switch her focus from individual change to socio cultural change.

Alli is an autistic person with attention, sensory processing and executive functioning difficulties. She works within a neurodiversity framework that favours deep acceptance and regulation over assimilation and intervention, and shares her lived experience of autism openly within her seminars, workshops and conferences as part of her ‘emotive storytelling mixed with science’ approach to education.

In 2016 Alli was named a ‘National AMP Tomorrow Maker’ for her contribution to supporting Australian families through her 2 day workshop, Brains = Behaviours, which is now offered as a 10 week eCourse. In 2018 she founded The Brain Care Café, an online membership for adults aiming to self-regulate through therapeutic based music experiences.

Allison is a regular contributor to online network ParentTV, and radio station ‘Vision Australia’.

She lives in the rainforest of Lutruwita (Tasmania), with her husband and 2 children, where she enjoys the beach, the bush and baths.
Alli holds a Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Teaching (University of New England, 2003), a Master of Music Therapy (University of Queensland, 2005) and Neurologic Music Therapy training (Academy of Neurologic Music Therapy, 2016).

Formally registered with the Australian Music Therapy Association and World Federation of Music Therapy, she has worked in private practice since 2007 across the areas of early childhood, adolescent mental health, youth justice, neuro-rehabilitation and aged, dementia and palliative care.

Allison is an autistic person with attention, sensory processing and executive functioning difficulties. She works within a neurodiversity framework that favours regulation over intervention, and shares her lived experience of autism openly within her seminars, workshops and conferences as part of her ‘emotive storytelling mixed with science’ approach to education.

In 2016  Allison was named a ‘National AMP Tomorrow Maker’ for her contribution to supporting Australian families through her two day workshop, Brains = Behaviours, which is now offered as a 10 week eCourse. In 2018 she created The Brain Care Café, an online membership for adults aiming to self-regulate through therapeutic music experiences.

Allison is a regular contributor to online networks ParentTV and radio station ‘Vision Australia’.

She lives in the rainforest of regional Tasmania, with her husband and two children, where she enjoys the beach, the bush and baths.
Statements
As a former music therapist I have benefited from the institutionalised education of universities, and continue to engage in and benefit from colonialism in the ways of Western music making and experiencing, within a very narrow and whitewashed square. I recognise that music is inherently part of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island culture, that this culture was stolen, and replaced with the Western music framework I have spent my career engaging with and working under.
I commit to deepening my insight into the cultural appropriation of music, to respect and hold space for language, kinship, knowledge, art, music, performance and storytelling sovereign to this nation and to fully exploring my use of music so that it may become a tool for cultural safety and cultural respect.
I acknowledge that there has been no cultural exchange on these lands, and therefore my position and platform within music therapy, allied health and education and public speaking was/is an honour and privilege.
I openly celebrate my own neuro-divergent culture, support Neurodiversity in all its forms, welcome BIPOC, gender and sexual diversity in this space and hold to identity and ability inclusive language.
As an autistic person I recognise autism as a disability, not a disorder, in alignment with the social model of disability, and I make the following statements about inclusivity on behalf of Allison Davies Pty Ltd:
I am passionate about re-membering my sovereign voice, and supporting others to do the same. Our voice is one of our greatest tools for self expression, emotional release, advocacy and empowerment, yet it has been suppressed for so long that our culture firmly believes our voice should be used for cognitive based spoken communication only. Throughout history our voices have been supressed, silenced, limited, cancelled, mocked, questioned and ignored, and I commit to using my work as a way of dismantling the patriarchal censorship of voice, and empowering our vocal autonomy.
I consider neurodivergent people the experts of neurodivergence, and acknowledge that peer reviewed research is often flawed due to cultural bias, funding bias and the Western Hierarchy of Evidence (rational ways of knowing valued over embodied ways of knowing.) Therefore, my resources are informed by lived experience, scientific enquiry, academic research, expert opinion and various other formal and informal documentation.
I am passionate about dismantling the great musical myth of ‘being musical’. It is common in our culture to think of some people as musical and others as not. The ones we call musical are typically the ones who’s parents could afford piano lessons, who are physically able to play a western instrument, who have the self efficacy to stand in front of a crowd and sing into a microphone, who express their musically in alignment with the Western Scale (aka ‘sing in tune’). These are deeply conditioned beliefs that have led us to perpetuate the exclusivity of music and overlook the privilege in which this concept is rooted...
...I commit to using my work as a tool for challenging the rhetoric around what music IS and what music IS NOT, to enhance the inclusivity of music experience and to shift the focus away from music as entertainment and education and towards expression and experience.
“Alli teaches with such love, warmth and understanding through her lived experience. I felt safe, seen and held in this sometimes difficult parenting life.” - Brains = Behaviours participant, 2020
Pedagogical Influences
Neurodiversity Framework
Critical Disability Theory
Gestalt Therapy
Jungian Psychology
Polyvagal Theory
Trauma informed
Psychosomatic framework
Critical Indigenous Theory
Socio Cultural Framework
Feminism
Free E-book
Melodic Mantra is a music based affirmation practice: your words are sung, your brain is highly active, your nervous system falls in sync, your body, mind & spirit embody your truth and you remember your musicality. This free 20-page workbook will guide you to embody the practice of melodic mantra.
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